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Lubrication by Polyelectrolytes – Ionic Strength, Valency and Geometry
Start Date: 3/8/2013Start Time: 4:00 PM
End Date: 3/8/2013End Time: 5:30 PM

Event Description
Dr. Lin Han, assistant professor in BIOMED, will discuss how polyelectrolytes effectively reduce surface friction by decreasing surface contact adhesion, and creating a fluid-like hydration sheath surrounding charged groups. Utilizing lateral force microcopy, Dr. Han and his team investigated the mechanisms and environmental factors that can quantitatively control the magnitude of polyelectrolyte surface friction coefficient, μ, at nano- to micrometer deformation length scales. In the first model system, with a microspherical tip, lateral force microscopy was utilized to measure the friction of an end-attached monolayer of the comb-like, negatively charged, biomacromolecules extracted from articular cartilage, aggrecan. In a second model system, we studied the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride) / poly(acrylic acid) (PAH/PAA) in various microscale geometries (planar film versus tube forest). Understanding these environmental factors provides a platform to design dynamic substrates with quantitatively controllable μ at nm- to μm-scales. This work thus holds great potential for fabricating dynamic substrates with tunable surface friction and energy dissipation capabilities for use in applications sensitive to surface properties, such as biosensors, cell adhesion, and tissue engineering.
Contact Information:
Name: Banu Onaral
Phone: 215-895-2247
Email: banu.onaral@drexel.edu
Biomed DEC.jpg
Location:
The Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building, located on the northeast corner of 33rd and Chestnut Streets.
Audience:
  • Alumni
  • Current Students
  • Faculty
  • Prospective Students
  • Public
  • Staff

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